The conference will begin with an evening welcome reception on Friday, October 25th at the Stanford Park Hotel (100 El Camino Real, Menlo Park, CA 94025). The conference panel sessions commence the following day, Saturday, October 26th, at Paul Brest Hall, in Munger Hall 4 (555 Salvatierra Way, Stanford, CA 94305), located directly behind Stanford Law School. Outspoken animal advocate, award-winning television journalist, and bestselling author Jane Velez-Mitchell will be the keynote speaker for the 2013 Animal Law Conference during the Saturday banquet dinner. All panel sessions on Sunday, October 27th will take place at Stanford Law School (559 Nathan Abbott Way, Stanford, CA 94305).

In order to reduce paper waste, we have created an online conference guide using the EventMobi app. You can access the simple app at this link. The event app includes the conference agenda, speaker bio and photos, sponsor information, maps, logistics, feedback forms, social media links and more! You are also able to create an attendee profile and customize your personal agenda, if you wish.

6:30 – 9:00 p.m.

Reception and Welcome at the Stanford Park Hotel

100 El Camino Real, Menlo Park, CA 94025

We invite you to enjoy appetizers and drinks while networking with fellow conference attendees.

Welcome to Stanford

M. Elizabeth Magill

Richard E. Lang, Professor of Law and Dean, Stanford Law School

Welcome to the Animal Law Conference

Stephen Wells, Executive Director, Animal Legal Defense Fund

The Development of Animal Law in Academia

Robert Klonoff, Dean and Professor of Law, Lewis & Clark Law School

Introductions by Jeff Pierce, Litigation Fellow, Animal Legal Defense Fund

All panel sessions on Saturday will take place in Paul Brest Hall in Munger Building 4 at Stanford University. Continental Breakfast will be available outside of Paul Brest Hall from 7:30-9:15 a.m. Click here to view a map of conference locations on campus.

8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

SALDF Breakfast

Pamela Hart, Director, Animal Law Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Tom Linney, Pro Bono Coordinator, Animal Law Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Dr. Nicole Pallotta, Student Programs Coordinator, Animal Law Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Kelly Levenda, fellow, Animal Law Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

The SALDF breakfast allows students from around the country who are interested in animal law to meet, share ideas and information, and build stronger SALDF programs over coffee and vegan baked goods.

9:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Working Together to Reform Factory Farming

Kathy Hessler, Director and Clinical Professor of Law, Lewis & Clark Law School

Deborah Sivas, Luke W. Cole Professor of Environmental Law; Director, Environmental Law Clinic, Stanford Law School

Jen Sorenson, Attorney, Litigation Team, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

Joyce Tischler, Founder and General Counsel, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Moderator: David Cassuto, Professor of Law, Pace Law School

Factory farming has negative impacts on animal protection, the environment, human health, farm workers, and farming communities. There are common themes that serve to unite attorneys working to protect animals, humans and the environment. This panel of legal experts will explore ways in which we can work together to confront climate change, mass abuse of animals, destruction of rainforests, damages to air quality and waterways, exploitation of farm and slaughterhouse workers and human health issues growing out of factory farming. The goal is to launch legal initiatives to support our common vision of a healthy and just planet for all inhabitants.

11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Break

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Finding New Ways to Protect Animals: Civil Legislative Solutions for Criminal Acts

Scott Heiser, Director, Criminal Justice Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Gavin Parsons, Partner, Troutman Sanders LLP

Moderator: Jenni James, Litigation Fellow, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Criminal statutes prohibiting animal cruelty are only as effective as the prosecutors who choose to enforce them. Even the most enthusiastic prosecutor may be constrained by limited resources, political pressures, and evidentiary hurdles. Some states offer a solution: giving citizens the power of civil enforcement. Judges in these states can grant preliminary and permanent injunctions and determine the animal’s care and custody. In this panel we will discuss which states have this sort of legislation, looking closely at a recent application of North Carolina’s Section 19A, and consider how to create a nationwide trend of allowing civil injunction to stop animal cruelty.

12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

Lunch

Stanford Faculty Club

1:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Demystifying Jury Selection: The Right Tools for the Job

Richard P. Matthews, Senior Trial Consultant, Juryology – Trial Consulting & Jury Studies

Moderator: Scott Heiser, Director, Criminal Justice Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Jury selection is often the weak part of a courtroom lawyer’s game — certainly one of the most anxiety-producing tasks as counsel gets closer to the trial date. Noted trial consultant Rich Matthews says that not only should jury selection not be feared, it must be embraced in order for lawyers to do their best. He will discuss the best tools and techniques for jury selection, promising that lawyers will feel more confident going into their next trial. Rich invites everyone to follow his Juryology blog as a resource for jury persuasion and techniques.

2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Break

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Current Cases and Legislation: What’s Hot?

Carter Dillard, Director of Litigation, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Chris Green, Director of Legislative Affairs, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Moderator: Sarah Luick, Board Chair, Animal Legal Defense Fund

The field of animal law is developing at a blazing speed, and it can be hard to stay on top of the latest, and most important developments. But, not to worry. Animal Legal Defense Fund litigation and legislation experts are here to share with you the most important and exciting recent state and federal animal law developments and how they may impact your practice and the future direction of the field.

3:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Break

3:45 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

You Want Me to Eat What? Learn How Business is Trending to Meat Alternatives

David Benzaquen, Founder and CEO, PlantBased Solutions

Dr. Patrick Brown, Professor of Biochemistry, Stanford School of Medicine; Member, Stanford Cancer Institute

Josh Tetrick, CEO, Hampton Creek Foods

Moderator: Lisa Franzetta, Director of Communications, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Test-tube hamburgers are making headlines, and supporters from Biz Stone to Bill Gates have backed high-tech alternatives to animal products as foods for a new, more sustainable generation. What is “faux meat,” and is anyone buying? This panel will also explore the opportunities and potential challenges that exist within the current legislative and regulatory environment as plant-based alternatives to the products of factory farms hit the mainstream.

5:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Banquet Dinner, Awards Ceremony and Keynote Address
Stanford Faculty Club

5:15 p.m.

Dinner Begins

5:15 p.m.

Awards Ceremony

Pamela Hart, Assistant Dean, Animal Law Program; Executive Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Pamela Hart, Director, Animal Law Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

The Animal Legal Defense Fund will present the 2013 Advancement in Animal Law Pro Bono Achievement Awards. Awards will also be presented for: Animal Law Leadership and Student Animal Legal Defense Fund Chapter of the Year.

Attorney Recipients:
– Virginia Coleman, Ropes & Gray LLP
– Anthony Eliseuson, Dentons US LLP
– Zachary Golden, Ropes & Gray LLP
– Erik Ideta, Troutman Sanders LLP
– Alison Langlais, Proskauer Rose LLP
– Jessica Rostoker, Latham & Watkins LLP
– David Zaft, Caldwell Leslie & Proctor, PC
Law Firm Award Recipients:
– Bingham McCutchen, LLP
– Fenwick & West, LLP
– Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, LLP
– HendlerLaw Irell & Manella, LLP
– Kirkland & Ellis, LLP
– McKenna Long & Aldridge, LLP
– Moye White, LLP
– Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, LLP
– Steptoe & Johnson, LLP
– Winston & Strawn, LLP

7:15 p.m. 8:15 p.m.

Keynote Address

Jane Velez-Mitchell, Television Journalist; Author

Introduction by Pamela Hart, Assistant Dean, Animal Law Program; Executive Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

All panel sessions on Sunday will take place at Stanford Law School, in Rooms 190 & 290. Continental Breakfast will be available in the Crocker Garden, behind the law school, from 7:30-9:15 a.m.

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Room 290 – Careers in Animal Law Breakfast

Jenni James, Litigation Fellow, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Nicole Roth, Contract Attorney, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe; Board Member, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Meena Alagappan, Executive Director, Humane Education Advocates Reaching Teachers (HEART)

Tom Linney, Pro Bono Coordinator, Animal Law Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Moderator: Pamela Hart, Director, Animal Law Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Creative Employment Opportunities: What are the paths taken by law students and lawyers to secure rewarding careers in animal law? What can students do while still in law school to increase their chances of landing an animal law job? Viewed from various sectors, learn what works from this panel of legal experts.

9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

Break

9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Room 190 – Working on an International Level to Replace, Reduce, Refine the Use of Animals in Research and Testing: Where Do We Go From Here?

David Cassuto, Professor of Law, Pace Law School

Pamela Frasch, Assistant Dean, Animal Law Program; Executive Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Dr. Paul Locke, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Moderator: Pamela Frasch, Assistant Dean, Animal Law Program; Executive Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Which countries are the most progressive and which are the least progressive when it comes to using animals in research? What can we, as legal professionals, do to help reduce and replace the use of animals in research and testing abroad while we live in the U.S.? This panel will explore animal testing in Europe, South America, and Asia, with a particular focus on the 2013 EU Cosmetic Directive, Horizon 2020, international legal limitations, harmonization challenges, and what the U.S.-based advocate can do to assist in changing the research paradigm that will help animals.

Room 290 – What Are Our Ethical Duties to Wildlife?

David Favre, Professor of Law & The Nancy Heathcote Professor of Property and Animal Law, Michigan State University College of Law; Editor-in-Chief, Animal Legal & Historical Center

Paul Waldau, Lead Faculty Member, Anthrozoology Graduate Program, Canisius College; President, Religion and Animals Institute

Moderator: Amy Jesse, 2L, Lewis & Clark Law School

The past few years have marked a shift in human perception of wildlife, with many accepting that wildlife ought to be free to live independent of humans. Yet, this sentiment has not been reflected in our legal system. This panel takes an ethical/rights approach to wildlife, as opposed to the traditional hunting/conservation/management course. It is a discussion of wildlife within a “rights” paradigm, focusing on what rights wildlife ought to have and what laws should be created in our courts, legislature and/or federal agencies to allow for these rights to be recognized and enforced.

10:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Break

10:30 a.m.- 11:30 a.m.

Room 190 – The Intersection of Animal Law, Race, Culture and Gender

Claire Jean Kim, Associate Professor of Political Science, School of Social Sciences, University of California – Irvine

Maneesha Deckha, Associate Professor, University of Victoria Faculty of Law

Moderator: Matthew Liebman, Senior Staff Attorney, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Critical race theory and postcolonial feminism have highlighted how our identities form at the intersections of a multitude of social and biological factors, including race, class, culture, sexuality, gender, ability, and species. An intersectional analysis of oppression insists on highlighting how these factors interact to create and contest existing distributions of social and political power, including exploitation of animals. How can an intersectional approach to animal law enrich our analysis of exploitation and foster more effective coalitional advocacy? Professor Deckha and Professor Kim will discuss theories of intersectionality and apply them to topical issues in animal law, including the movement for animal personhood, campaigns against live animal markets, and the Michael Vick dogfighting case.

Room 290 – Gene modification: Ethical Implications of Using Animals and Humans to Experiment On

Dr. Taimie Bryant, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Patty Lovera, Assistant Director, Food & Water Watch

Moderator: Taylor Duty, 3L, Lewis & Clark Law School

Genetic engineering of animals has increased significantly in recent years, and the use of this technology brings with it ethical issues, some of which relate to animal welfare and some of which relates to whether non-human animals should be used at all. As a result of the extra challenges that genetically engineered animals bring, are governing bodies developing relevant regulations and policies that call for increased vigilance and monitoring of potential animal welfare impacts? If not, why not, and if so, how effective are those regulations and policies, and how can they be improved? What is the role of the animal law community in this process and are there available legal challenges?

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Break

11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Room 190 – The Police Shot My Dog

Scott Sargent, Captain II, Use of Force Division, The Los Angeles Police Department

Karen Snell, Civil Rights Attorney

Moderator: Diane Balkin, Contract Attorney, Criminal Justice Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund

There is an increased concern and awareness about the encounters law enforcement agents have with dogs that result in officers shooting and fatally wounding the dog. Dog owners have recently been successful in landmark cases and have been awarded substantial monetary damages based on federal civil rights violations. Police officers may also be facing criminal sanctions. Law enforcement authorities recognize that they need to provide training and strategic plans for their officers regarding dog encounters. They need to become educated about the alternatives to the use of lethal force. This involves both education and accountability. This panel will discuss the legal precedents and the training and directives evolving within the law enforcement community.

Room 290 – Ag gag: Litigation, Legislation and Other Approaches to Countering This Trend

Justin Marceau, Associate Professor, University of Denver, Sturm College of Law

Matthew Liebman, Senior Staff Attorney, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Moderator: Nicole Roth, Contract Attorney, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe; Board Member, Animal Legal Defense Fund

In the last few years, legislators in states across the country have introduced dozens of bills to criminalize undercover investigations at factory farms and slaughterhouses. These “ag gag” bills are the meat, egg, and dairy industries’ response to a plethora of exposés by animal protection organizations that have revealed gruesome animal cruelty and routine industry practices that cause immense animal suffering. In most instances, the animal protection movement has rallied to defeat these “ag gag” bills, but such laws are now on the books in six states. Earlier this year, the Animal Legal Defense Fund and People For the Ethical Treatment of Animals filed a federal lawsuit to have Utah’s ag gag law declared unconstitutional, the first lawsuit of its kind. This panel will feature two of the lead attorneys on the case, who will discuss the constitutionality of ag gag laws and provide updates on the case.

12:45 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Room 190 & 290 – Closing Remarks

Stephen Wells, Executive Director, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Pamela Frasch, Assistant Dean, Animal Law Program; Executive Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School