Agenda

6:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Welcome Reception

The conference will kick off with an evening reception and keynote presentation in the Kridel Grand Ballroom, 3rd Floor, in the Portland Art Museum‘s Mark Building.
Guests will enjoy appetizers and drinks while networking with fellow conference attendees.
1119 SW Park Avenue, Portland, OR 97205

7:15 – 7:30 p.m.

Welcomes & Introductions

Pamela Frasch, Associate Dean, Animal Law Program; Founder, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Stephen Wells, Executive Director, Animal Legal Defense Fund

7:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Keynote Presentation by Congressman Earl Blumenauer

Subject to Congressional Calendar

Congressman Earl Blumenauer, 3rd District of Oregon

Introduction by: Dean Jennifer Johnson, Lewis & Clark Law School

All panel sessions and lunch on Saturday will take place in the Kridel Grand Ballroom, 3rd Floor, in the Portland Art Museum‘s Mark Building.
1119 SW Park Avenue, Portland, OR 97205

9:00 – 9:15 a.m.

Introduction to the Legal Status of Animals

Joyce Tischler, Founder, Animal Legal Defense Fund; Professor of Practice, Animal Law, Lewis & Clark Law School

Introduction by: Pamela Hart, Executive Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

The Animal Law Movement is deeply involved in wide-ranging work that will transform the legal status of animals. This year’s conference will explore how this is playing out in civil, criminal and international law, as well as academia, politics and scientific study.

9:15 – 10:30 a.m.

Understanding Our Clients: Philosophy, Ethology and the Law

Angela Fernandez, Associate Professor, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Becca Franks, Visiting Assistant Professor, New York University

Ramona Ilea, PhD, Philosophy Department Chair and Professor, Pacific University Oregon

Moderator: Priscilla Rader, Education Coordinator, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Moral consideration for animals is still hotly debated despite studies continuing to show that animals are sentient beings who feel pain and seek pleasure. This panel will discuss the ethical theories behind animal protection, how these theories have been bolstered by recent advancements in our understanding of animals, and the ways in which the law has both paved the way and has been led by society’s shifting paradigm on how we treat and view animals.

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

More than Property: Advancing Animal Status within the Criminal Justice System

Lora Dunn, Criminal Justice Program Director, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Jake Kamins, State of Oregon Animal Cruelty Deputy District Attorney, Benton County District Attorney’s Office

Melinda Merck, DVM, Owner, Veterinary Forensics Consulting, LLC

Moderator: Kathleen Wood, Criminal Justice Program Fellow, Animal Legal Defense Fund

There is sometimes a misconception that our ability to protect animals within the criminal justice system is too limited and inadequate to effect real change. But recent developments in criminal law—recognition of animals as victims and sentient beings, burgeoning courtroom animal advocate programs, and cases focused on animals’ emotional suffering—make this an exciting time to be a practitioner in criminal animal law. This panel will explore the numerous ways that animals are considered “more than property” in the criminal justice system and how professionals in the field, from prosecutors to veterinarians, can further this trend and have a real impact on animal victims.

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

Lunch

1:00 – 2:15 p.m.

Transforming Animals’ Status through Civil Litigation

Matthew Liebman, Litigation Program Director, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Kevin Schneider, Executive Director, Nonhuman Rights Project

Delcianna Winders, Assistant Clinical Professor of Law and Animal Law Litigation Clinic Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Moderator: Kathy Hessler, Clinical Professor of Law and Animal Law Clinic Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

This panel will discuss the challenges and promises of using civil litigation to transform animals’ legal status. Panelists will discuss high profile animal rights cases, including the Animal Legal Defense Fund’s attempt to establish animals’ right to sue their abusers for damages and the Nonhuman Rights Project’s efforts to win writs of habeas corpus for chimps and elephants. The panel will also explore how civil litigation efforts that may formally fall short of securing fundamental changes to animals’ legal status can nevertheless yield critically important changes to their de facto status and play a role in paving the way toward more fundamental rights in the future.

2:15 – 2:30 p.m.

Break

2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

All the World’s a Stage: Raising the Curtain on International Animal Advancements

Rajesh Reddy, Animal Law LL.M. Program Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Amy P. Wilson, Director and Co-Founder, Animal Law Reform South Africa

Moderator: Pamela Hart, Executive Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Slowly but surely, our legal theater is seeing animals being transformed from mere props and property to players on the global stage. Join these experts as they map this international evolution in animal status and shine a spotlight on the rights, protections, and considerations that are helping to give it shape.

3:30-3:45 p.m.

Break

3:45-5:15 p.m.

Sound Animal Representation: Navigating Legal Ethics and Compassion Fatigue as an Advocate for Animals

Russ Mead, Shared Earth Foundation Visiting Professor, Lewis & Clark Law School

Michelle Kirton, Associate Director of Counseling and Training Director, Lewis & Clark Law School

David Rosengard, Staff Attorney, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Doing the work of advocating for animals within the legal system can be challenging. Professional ethics hypotheticals are rarely crafted with animal law in mind; nor are legal self-care models explicitly built to account for constant exposure to the visceral injustice faced by animals. In this session, we walk through the basics of compassion fatigue and common ethical quandaries—laying out ways to address each in turn.

5:15-6:15 p.m.

Break

6:15 – 8:30 p.m.

Banquet Dinner, Awards and Keynote Presentation

The banquet dinner and evening program will take place in the Kridel Grand Ballroom, 3rd Floor, in the Portland Art Museum‘s Mark Building.
1119 SW Park Avenue, Portland, OR 97205

6:15 – 7:15 p.m.

Banquet Dinner

7:15 – 7:30 p.m.

Animal Legal Defense Fund’s Pro Bono Achievement Awards

Tom Linney, Pro Bono Program Director, Animal Legal Defense Fund

7:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Keynote Presentation by Maneesha Deckha

Maneesha Deckha, Professor; Lansdowne Chair in Law, University of Victoria Faculty of Law

Introduction by: Pamela Frasch, Associate Dean, Animal Law Program; Founder, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

All concurrent panel sessions on Sunday will take place in the Fields Sunken Ballrooms (1st Floor) and the Kridel Grand Ballroom (3rd Floor) in the Portland Art Museum‘s Mark Building.
1119 SW Park Avenue, Portland, OR 97205

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Fields Sunken Ballroom (1st Floor)

Animal Law Clinicians: Training the Next Generation

Kathy Hessler, Clinical Professor of Law and Animal Law Clinic Director, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

Kim Connolly, Director of Clinical Legal Education; Director of the Advocacy Institute; Vice Dean for Advocacy and Experiential Education; Professor, University of Buffalo School of Law

Moderator: Megan Senatori, Strategic Initiatives and Outreach Advisor, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

This panel will address some of the unique and creative work being done in animal law clinics to further develop the field of animal law and to prepare students to be effective legal advocates.

9:00 – 10:15 a.m. Kridel Grand Ballrooms (3rd Floor)

Electing Representatives who Represent Animals

Kelly Peterson, Oregon Senior State Director, The Humane Society of the United States

Brian Posewitz, Secretary, Treasurer and Administrator, Humane Voters Oregon

Diana Urban, Retired Connecticut State Representative and Chair of the Committee on Children; Founder and President, Protecting Kids and Pets Partnership

Moderator: Jennifer Hauge, Legislative Affairs Manager, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Animals can’t vote, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t have a voice in the political process. Making laws to improve the lives of animals, however, doesn’t just start by introducing a bill. The real work begins by helping animal-friendly candidates get elected and then collaborating with them on issues over time until they can become a true legislative champion. Learn how you can elevate animal-friendly lawmakers to positions of power.

10:15 – 10:35 a.m.

Break

10:35 – 11:50 a.m. Fields Sunken Ballroom (1st Floor)

Persons yet Unknown: Animals, Chimeras, Artificial Intelligence and Beyond

Kate Darling, Research Specialist, MIT Media Lab

Dr. Paresh Kathrani, Director of Education and Training, Chartered Institute of Arbitrators

Moderator: Ryan Calo, Lane Powell & D. Wayne Gittinger Endowed Professorship, University of Washington School of Law; Faculty Co-Director, Tech Policy Lab, University of Washington

Not only do we continue to learn more about the capacities of nonhuman animals with each new day but technology continues to grow in leaps and bounds, with artificial species being created and artificial intelligence inching closer to sentience. Given these advancements, don’t miss out on arguments for and against who deserves to join humans as legal persons under the law.

10:35 – 11:50 a.m. Kridel Grand Ballrooms (3rd Floor)

Creative Approaches to Fighting Climate Change

Randall Abate, Rechnitz Family/Urban Coast Institute Endowed Chair in Marine and Environmental Law and Policy; Professor, Department of Political Science and Sociology, Monmouth University

Jessica Blome, Senior Associate, Greenfire Law, PC

Daniel Waltz, Staff Attorney, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Moderator: Christopher Berry, Senior Staff Attorney, Animal Legal Defense Fund

Climate change is the most salient example of the anthropocene, our current geological age which is marked by the domination of humans over the nonhuman world. That domination must have implications for animals’ status as property, given that the assumption that enabled the anthropocene is that animals and their habitat, i.e. nature, is a human resource to be used. This panel will explore that core question about animal status, using various legal approaches in response.

11:50 a.m. Fields Sunken Ballroom (1st Floor)

Closing Remarks

Pamela Frasch, Associate Dean, Animal Law Program; Founder, Center for Animal Law Studies at Lewis & Clark Law School

11:50 a.m. Kridel Grand Ballrooms (3rd Floor)

Closing Remarks

Stephen Wells, Executive Director, Animal Legal Defense Fund